Acts of the Apostles-The Training Of The Twelve


I am writing tonight from the beauiful Tampa Bay area.

Acts of the Apostles Chapter 2

For the carrying on of His work, Christ did not choose the learning or eloquence of the Jewish Sanhedrin or the power of Rome. Passing by the self-righteous Jewish teachers, the Master Worker chose humble, unlearned men to proclaim the truths that were to move the world. These men He purposed to train and educate as the leaders of His church. They in turn were to educate others and send them out with the gospel message. That they might have success in their work they were to be given the power of the Holy Spirit. Not by human might or human wisdom was the gospel to be proclaimed, but by the power of God.  {AA 17.1} 

An education and a degree are two separate things. Not everyone who is educated has a degree, and not everyone who has a degree is educated. Jesus wanted his disciples to be educated and they were, just not by the self righteous Pharisees. So today, Jesus uses men and women whom He educates not by the might and power of the world but by His Spirit.

As it was with the early church, so it will be in the last days. ” In the last solemn work few great men will be engaged. . . . God will work a work in our day that but few anticipate. He will raise up and exalt among us those who are taught rather by the unction of His Spirit than by the outward training of scientific institutions. These facilities are not to be despised or condemned; they are ordained of God, but they can furnish only the exterior qualifications. God will manifest that He is not dependent on learned, self-important mortals.–Testimonies Vol. 5  p. 80, 82 (1882). 

Thus the message of the third angel will be proclaimed. As the time comes for it to be given with greatest power, the Lord will work through humble instruments, leading the minds of those who consecrate themselves to His service. The laborers will be qualified rather by the unction of His Spirit than by the training of literary institutions. -The Great Controversy, p. 606

There is much to be said for education both in the classroom and in the field. Many have educated themselves by reading books, who were not able to attend a school. Still, they have book knowledge. However, book knowledge is not everything. The best example I can think of is several years ago when I was a lay pastor in Fort Worth. I had a friend who was a student pastor at Southwestern Adventist University in Keene, near Fort Worth. He and his wife had recently had a baby when I called one evening. My friend was quick to get off the phone that night which did not bother me. I had no clue anything was amiss until he called me back the following day. He said, “I am sorry I got off the phone so quick yesterday but my wife and I were having an argument and she was upset with me. She was trying to breastfeed the baby and it was not working for her so I started telling her how to do it and she became very angry with me.” I asked him how in the world he thought he could instruct his wife on nursing a baby. He responded defiantly, “I read it in a book!” Well guess what my friend? Book knowledge is not everything. I think this is a prime example on how we sometimes put too much emphasis on book knowledge instead of practical training.

I have spent my whole life reading and studying about Jesus and theology. Yet what I have woven into my ministry over the years has not all come from books. I have learned letters from books, but I have learned love and compassion from seeing it manifested in the lives of my self sacrificing family and friends. It was caught not taught. I still have a long ways to go though.

You may find more studies and devotionals at In Light of The Cross.

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