Romans 1; The Power of Grace and Faith


I am writing tonight from the beautiful Tampa Bay area.

And declared [to be] the Son of God with power, according to the spirit of holiness, by the resurrection from the dead:  By whom we have received grace and apostleship, for obedience to the faith among all nations, for his name:  Romans 1:4-5

Romans brings out the power of grace and God’s unconditional love. We also see in Romans the power of grace. In Romans 1:5 we see that grace gives us obedience.

For therein is the righteousness of God revealed from faith to faith: as it is written, The just shall live by faith.  Romans 1:17

While grace gives us the power to obey, faith gives us the power to be just and right with God. Many try to teach that faith and grace release us from the obligation to obey the law. If that was true, then this verse would read that the UNjust shall life by faith. It does not say that. It says the Just shall live by faith. Faith and grace are not a license to sin. Martin Luther, the champion of grace and righteousness by faith, beheld sins in the church that he knew did not belong. “At last he beheld in the distance the seven-hilled city. With deep emotion he prostrated himself upon the earth, exclaiming, “Holy Rome, I salute thee!” He entered thecity, visited the churches, listened to the marvelous tales repeated by priests and monks, and performed all the ceremonies required. Everywhere he looked upon scenes that filled him with astonishment and horror. He saw that iniquity existed among all classes of the clergy. He heard indecent jokes from prelates, and was filled with horror at their awful profanity, even during mass. As he mingled with the monks and citizens, he met dissipation, debauchery. Turn where he would, in the place of sanctity he found profanation. “It is incredible,” he wrote, “what sins and atrocities are committed in Rome; they must be seen and heard to be believed. So that it is usual to say, ‘If there be a hell, Rome is built above it. It is an abyss whence all sins proceed.”  {Great Controversy, p. 124} Martin Luther knew that grace was not a license to sin. He knew that while grace justifies, and frees us from the penalty of sin, that it also sanctifies and frees us from the power of sin.

As Voltaire said years later, “If you want me to believe in your Redeemer, you’re going to have to start looking a lot more redeemed.”

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